Mr. David

Daddy B. Nice's #72 ranked Southern Soul Artist



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"Where U You Want Me To Put It"

Mr. David

Composed by James Harris III, McKinley Horton & Terry Lewis




April 20, 2013: New Single Alert! From...

Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "BREAKING" Southern Soul Singles Review For. . .

APRIL 2013

1. "Mr. Right Now"----Mr. David

All the elements of a break-out hit--great melody, terrific lyrics, a one-of-a-kind sound, soulfulness coursing through every stanza--grace this unexpected treat. Mr. David lays down a vocal that will define him as a Southern Soul star for years to come.

Listen to Mr. David's "Mr. Right Now" on ReverbNation.

See Daddy B. Nice's #1 "Breaking" Southern Soul Single for April 2013.

**********

Daddy B. Nice's Profile:


Under-rated, obscure even by Southern Soul standards, Mr. David is a mature artist with three solid albums and a handful of memorable songs to his credit. David has cited Bobby Womack as a big influence, and although nothing in his music reiterates Womack's music, Mr. David--along with all the other musical skills he shares with the master--has Womack's nose for great material.

Three of Mr. David's songs hold legitimate claim to being Southern Soul standards, and many fans would include a fourth. They are, in order, "Where Do You Want Me To Put It, "Slide On," "Me Loving You" and (the fourth) "Shoo Da Wop." (And where do you draw the line? This excludes Mr. David's fine tune, "Jody's Creepin'.")

The fast jams "Slide On" and "Shoo Da Wop" are self-penned and obvious club songs, and they're both very good at what they do. The operatic slow jam "Where Do You Want Me To Put It" is composed by James Harris, McKinley Horton & Terry Lewis, but Mr. David's other great ballad, "Me Loving You," is also self-penned.

Mr. David's lyrics are often buried in the mix, and blurred even further by the vocal timbre Mr. David achieves when he bends and extends notes and his habit of swallowing words at the end of phrases. The songs--the best ones--are unabashedly melodic, with appeal in any market if only they weren't so doggoned gritty and soulful, which is of course what makes them manna for the Southern Soul faithful.

I'll admit to hardly knowing any of the lyrics to Mr. David's songs. The songs have a heft born of their compositional excellence that almost makes the lyrics irrelevant.

"Me Loving You" is the song with the dominant line that runs, "There's nothing wrong with me." For a long time I thought that was all there was to it, until I was unable to find any song by that title on a Mr. David album. Only then did I click samples on all three Mr. David CD's until I found "Me Loving You" and gradually clued into the fact Mr. David's singing, "There's / Nothing wrong with me / Loving you."

"Me Loving You" possesses a melancholic, yearning power--an emotion commonly associated with being in love--and even if one were incapable of catching the few intelligible lyrics, Mr. David creates an entire world of tension and romantic love, a kind of shelter-from-the-storm haven for troubled lovers.

"I don't know
Just how you were brought up,
But my daddy taught me
Never put my hands on a woman
Unless you were lifting her up."

"Me Loving You" is an anthem to civility, tenderness and respect in young men's dealings with young women. Originally a rapper, Mr. David knows well the corrosive effect on young people of the hiphop ethic of flashy possessions and the objectification of women, and he contrasts the drooping pants, naked butts and "bitch-this, bitch-that" of the hiphop lifestyle with the maturity of the "grown" men who respect the opposite sex.

"This goes out to the young boys
Who's (sic) thinking that it's cool
Walking around with teeth
Full of gold and diamonds,
Looking like a fool.

Then they wonder
Why their girlfriends
Ended up with an older man.
Because we know how
To treat and respect our women
Better than those young boys can."

Mr. David refers to a Marvin Gaye song from long ago--I still haven't caught the title--and sums up with the refrain:

"Marvin and my daddy said,
'There's nothing wrong with me
Loving you.'"

Mr. David means there is nothing wrong with showing love, rather than disdain and contempt, for women, and Southern Soul music, by extension, is the vehicle for mature love, and the best conduit for Mr. David to express it.

"Slide On," a slide-and-steppin' song with shout-outs to Denise LaSalle, Jesse James, Mel Waiters, Betty Wright, Sir Charles Jones and Millie Jackson, is one of the legitimate, best 21st-century Southern Soul fast jams, as is its club-jam bookend, "Shoo Da Wop."

Listen to Mr. David singing "Shoo Da Wop" with Sir Charles Jones on YouTube.

The original "Shoo Da Wop" with background by Mr. David (without Sir Charles) is actually the purest version. In spite of his star power, Sir Charles actually distracts somewhat from the intense focus of the original. For fans it's a toss-up, and luckily both versions are included on Jody Is Back .

The phrase "Shoo Da Wop" also figures as a constant refrain in "Where Do You Want Me To Put It?," although it takes a back seat to the overwhelming intensity with which Mr. David delivers the vivid ballad's melodic groove.

Sample Mr. David's "Where You Want Me To Put It" on Amazon.

A fascinating song in terms of tempo, with one of the most unique arrangements in Southern Soul, "Where Do You Want Me To Put It" has the structure of a ballad but seemingly morphs into a fast song. The phrase "Where do you want me to put it?" bobs up repeatedly in what seems like a whirlpool of slow and fast musical currents, both running simultaneously.

As for exactly what "it" is, and "where" Mr. David's putting it, the song leaves much to the imagination of the listener. Sometimes the "it" appears to be a metaphor for intercourse and its sexual options, at other times "it" seems like some object Mr. David has brought to his loved one--perhaps flowers, groceries, candy or lingerie--and as the stanzas circle ever and ever deeper, David's repeated refrain of "Where do you want me to put it?" gathers emotional power.

The multiple meanings fold onto one another, giving the song's tight-lipped mystery first one interpretation, then another. Atmospheric keyboards and strings emphasize the romanticism. Mr. David pleads again and again for his loved one to "communicate," but the song has none of the double entendres of more salacious Southern Soul songs.

"It's time to come closer.
We've got the urge.
So baby, can we do it
Once or twice
Just to be heard?

We can work it out
Where can we break it down?
Or do you like it
When I get my groove on,
Round and round
And round and round?"

So a ballad that appears to be all about lovemaking really is all about the intricacies of communication and finding common ground--again, like "Me Loving You"--a mature and sophisticated approach to romance and lovemaking.

"Let's get it on.
Any time you're in the mood,
Give me a call.
Baby, say the word,
And I'll be right there.
I'm going to fill you up
With tender loving care."

Listen to "Where You Want Me To Put It" and other samples from SOUTHERN SOUL SINGER on Amazon.

--Daddy B. Nice


About Mr. David

David Jones, aka Mr. David, grew up in Aiken, South Carolina, a small town across the Savannah River from Augusta, Georgia. As a teen Jones met Tony Mercedes, an oft-travelled military brat whose father had relocated to Augusta.

David Jones would often compete in area talent contests with groups organized by Tony Mercedes. "I would always challenge his artists," Jones reported to CD Baby, "--because I thought they were just ok--and after eliminating all his artists, he took me on."

Still in his teens, Mercedes began promoting area concerts and producing local acts, and by his late twenties he was working at Atlanta's LaFace Records, where he was instrumental in signing David Jones to a rap recording contract as "Pressha." Pressha had a hit single, "Splackavellie," which first appeared on the Player's Club Soundtrack. Pressha's one and only album, Don't Get It Twisted, followed.

Mercedes moved onto Christian film-making in Los Angeles but continued to help guide Jones' career as Jones mentored under Barbara Thomas, who with Southern Soul recording artist Jesse James and his wife Jessica Minix had founded Gunsmoke Records in 1986.

Jones had decided to leave hiphop for Southern Soul and rhythm and blues, and he began work on his first album as a means of raising money to assist Ms. Thomas in fighting a losing battle with cancer. The result, Jody Is Back, Jones' debut as a Southern Soul performer named Mr. David, appeared in 2004 under the Tony Mercedes Records label, produced by Tony Mercedes.

The CD spawned two chitlin' circuit singles, a fast-jam duet with Sir Charles Jones called "Shoo Da Wop" (which Southern Soul's Daddy B. Nice called at the time "the best Sir Charles fast song ever") and a strong candidate for a Mr. David signature song in "Slide On."

Mr. David followed with Southern Soul Singer (Tony Mercedes Records, 2005) containing the uptempo ballad, "Where You Want Me To Put It."

Southern Soul Singer was distributed by Jackson, Mississippi's Waldoxy Records, which went on to sign Mr. David for his third CD, Me Loving You, in 2008. The album spawned the uptempo singles "Fatback & Collard Greens" and "Cheap Azz Bottle O' Wine" and the ballad "Me Loving You."


Song's Transcendent Moment

"I'll make you feel good.
Carry you to ecstasy.
When you give me direction,
Communicate with me.

Oh, tell me where
Do you want me to put it?
Do you want me to get it right?
Baby, what can I do with it?

. . . I don't want to lose it.
Baby tell me where
Do you want me to put it?"


Tidbits

1.

October 24, 2011:

His duet with Sir Charles Jones on his song "Shoo Da Wop" isn't the only musical pairing Mr. David is known for. In 2006 he collaborated with a new artist named Napoleon on a single that has maintained a devoted following--including your Daddy B. Nice--ever since: "Who You Been Loving."

This is the song with lyrics that include:

"He was licking like Marvin,
Stroking like Clarence. . .

And:

"The way you were moaning and shaking,
I thought it might be Willie Clayton
He must have put 500 in your thumb
Like old sugar daddy Tyrone. . . "

Mr. David's mark is all over "Who You Been Loving," especially in the grooving mid-tempo pace and the smooth transitions in and out of choruses. He's given a shout-out by Napoleon near the end, right after Napoleon exclaims, "Napoleon, this is your song." (And it is.)

Now, five years later, "Who You Been Lovin'" will be available for the first time commercially on a new EP from Napoleon titled Get Another Man. (Mo Hitz Ent., 2011)

Listen to Napoleon with Mr. David singing "Who You Been Lovin'."

2.

October 24, 2011:

Mr. David's "Jody's Creepin'" was included in the compilation CD, Southern Soul Radio (Waldoxy, 2007).


If You Liked. . . You'll Love

If you liked Eddie Leon's "Show And Tell," you'll love Mr. David's "Where Do You Want Me To Put It."




Honorary "B" Side

"Slide On"



5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Where U You Want Me To Put It by Mr. David
Where U You Want Me To Put It


CD: Southern Soul Singer
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Southern Soul Singer


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Slide On by Mr. David
Slide On


CD: Jody Is Back
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Jody Is Back


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Me Loving You by Mr. David
Me Loving You


CD: Me Loving You
Label: Waldoxy

Sample or Buy
Me Loving You


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Fatback And Collard Greens by Mr. David
Fatback And Collard Greens


CD: Me Loving You
Label: Waldoxy

Sample or Buy
Me Loving You (Waldoxy, 2008)


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Shoo Da Wop by Mr. David
Shoo Da Wop


CD: Jody Is Back
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Jody Is Back


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Shoo Da Wop w/ Sir Charles Jones by Mr. David
Shoo Da Wop w/ Sir Charles Jones


CD: Jody Is Back
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Jody Is Back


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Better When You Steal It   by Mr. David
Better When You Steal It


CD: Southern Soul Singer
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Southern Soul Singer


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Cheap Azz Bottle O' Wine  by Mr. David
Cheap Azz Bottle O' Wine


CD: Me Loving You
Label: Waldoxy

Sample or Buy
Me Loving You


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy I'll Satisfy by Mr. David
I'll Satisfy


CD: Southern Soul Singer
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Southern Soul Singer


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Jody's Creepin' by Mr. David
Jody's Creepin'


CD: Southern Soul Singer
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Southern Soul Singer


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Sara Smile by Mr. David
Sara Smile


CD: Jody Is Back
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Jody Is Back


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Two Step Like We Used To  by Mr. David
Two Step Like We Used To


CD: Southern Soul Singer
Label: Tony Mercedes

Sample or Buy
Southern Soul Singer (Tony Mercedes, 2005)


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