Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)

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"Mississippi Woman"

Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)

Composed by Floyd Hamberlin




February 10, 2018:

Denise LaSalle: An Appreciation

Daddy B. Nice notes: David Whiteis is the author of Southern Soul Blues, for which Denise LaSalle wrote the Forward. He is currently at work on an upcoming biography of Denise LaSalle.

When Denise LaSalle passed away on January 8, 2018, southern soul lost one of its most distinctive and joyful voices, as well as one of its most significant stylists. Most of all, though, we lost an effervescent, life-affirming presence, a woman who cultivated both fans and friends with dedication and grace--one of the music’s most beloved figures, both onstage and off.

The general outlines of her biography are well known. Born Ora Dee Allen in the country near Sidon, Mississippi on July 16 (various years have been cited for her birth, but it is now clear that she was born in 1934, somewhat earlier than most biographies have suggested), she grew up in the town of Belzoni, immersed in gospel music but also keenly aware of the blues and R&B that emanated from local jukes and cafes, and which played on the radio. Unhappy with the conditions that African-American people in Mississippi had to face in those days, she married young and moved to Chicago. That marriage didn’t work out, and she returned to Belzoni for a while, but by the early ‘50s she’d moved back north to stay.

In Chicago she held down day jobs, sang in a gospel quartet, and investigated the city’s thriving music scene. Then, in 1963, she met Billy “The Kid” Emerson, a legendary Sun Records blues/R&B recording artist who had also penned several songs (“Red Hot,” “When it Rains it Pours”) that had crossed over to become rockabilly/rock & roll standards. Emerson became her mentor, and in 1966 he released her first single, “A Love Reputaion” (co-written by Lee Baker Jr., who would eventually rise to fame as the bluesman Lonnie Brooks), on his Tarpon label. Chess picked the record up the following year. She released a couple more singles on Chess in 1968: One, “Private Property”/”Been Waiting,” she had recorded under the aegis of Emerson; the other, “Countdown”/”A Promise Is a Promise,” was the debut effort by the new team of Denise and Bill Jones, a Chicagoan with whom she initiated the labels Crajon, Parka, and Gold Star. Not incidentally, she also married him, becoming both his business partner and his life partner, at least for the next few years...

By this time, she had taken the stage name Denise LaSalle – “Denise,” because she thought it sounded more elegant and professional than “Dee;” “LaSalle” after a character she saw in a Mary Worth comic strip.

...The labels she co-owned with Bill Jones made some noise on the charts with a few of the artists they signed – both Bill Coday and the Sequins scored hits – but Denise’s own big break came in 1971, when the Detroit-based Westbound imprint signed her and released “Trapped By a Thing Called Love.” "Trapped" was her debut on the national charts, and it rapidly became a No. 1 R&B hit. She followed it up with “Now Run and Tell That” the following year, and she remained a steady presence on the R&B charts throughout most of the decade. In 1974, having separated from Bill Jones, she moved to Memphis.

As soul music gave way to disco, she began finding it difficult to sustain her success as a charting R&B artist. Then, in 1982, not long after she’d been released from MCA, she was contacted by Malaco Records’ legendary promo man Dave Clark, who asked her if she could write a new song for Z.Z. Hill to follow up Hill’s “Down Home Blues,” which had launched the soul-blues/southern soul juggernaut just a little bit before then. The song she wrote, “Someone Else is Steppin’ In,” was set to the same changes and the same rhythm as Hill’s smash. It was also a classic LaSalle tale of erotic combat that allowed Hill to inhabit the persona of a wrong-doing man paying for his transgressions--a surefire selling point in a market where women have traditionally been the major consumers. It became a standard almost immediately (although, like many “hits” in the burgeoning soul-blues/southern soul genre, it never charted nationally). She signed with the label soon thereafter, and before long she was one of the leading lights of the new style, rooted in the blues and deep-soul traditions but with enough modernist touches to attract a diverse fan base and keep its artists working steadily, both in the studio and on the road.

As a “soul-blues” artist, first with Malaco and then later with Ecko, she made some of her finest recordings--“Your Husband Is Cheating On Us,” "Lady In the Street," “Drop That Zero,” and her own definitive, r-rated version of “Someone Else Is Steppin’ In” are only a few of the better-known. Her voice deepened and coarsened over the years, but in most cases that only accentuated the bluesy toughness of her material. She also cultivated her bawdy image, especially in performance--“Snap, Crackle, and Pop,” a latter-day paean to cunnilingus in which she demanded that her man “just treat it like a lollipop” and then popped her tongue and smacked her lips to imitate the sound of a satisfied “coochie,” was not atypical.

But there was a purpose behind the pose. Even at her most scabrous, Denise charged her routines with a righteous undercurrent of sisterly solidarity. Like her friend and contemporary Millie Jackson, she honed the art of framing parables of empowerment in confrontational and profane language. She made it clear that she was speaking and singing (and cussing) on behalf of women who’d been dissatisfied and betrayed, and weren’t going to take it any longer. Thus, her indictment of macho poseurs who acted as if a woman should be glad just to “have a dick in the house,” and her insistence that satisfying a woman –sexually, financially, and emotionally– should be the first duty of a husband or a lover. “Real women would like you lick it before you stick it!” she declared, and if a man wouldn’t do a woman right, it was time to “drop that zero, and get yourself a hero.”...

Such proclamations bespoke a powerful ethic underlying her rowdy onstage persona; they served to redeem both the singer and her message. In the Queen’s domain, profanity--even promiscuity--in the service of justice was no vice.

...At the same time, there was another side to Denise LaSalle. She could mine depths of melancholy and regret (“Why Am I Missing You”); elevate her voice and her spirit in praise of the Lord (e.g., the gospel albums she released on her own Ordena and Angel In the Midst imprints), or spin an inspirational tale of perseverance and hard-won victory over poverty and oppression (her sublime and too-often overlooked “Child of the Ghetto”), as readily and eloquently as she could deliver a gritty blues testimonial (“It Be’s That Way Sometimes”) or a deliciously scabrous juke-joint Kama Sutra (“Snap, Crackle, and Pop”). Songs like these reflected a woman of intellectual, emotional, and spiritual substance, a life traveler who cared deeply about the world and its people, a wordsmith and poet whose serious creations invoked her love for the blues tradition and its importance in American music (her prose poem “America’s Prodigal Son”) and her righteous anger about the way her people had been treated throughout history, and the way they have continued to struggle into the present day (her poem “Cry of the Black Soul”).

For those of us who were privileged to know her personally, though, it’s her love, and the depth of her spirit, that we will miss most. In her later years she was known, at least in the South, as the “Queen of the Blues” (the actual coronation occurred in her hometown of Belzoni in 2009), but I will always think of her, first and foremost, as the Queen of Hearts: I have known very few people with a heart as deep, as tender, and as giving as the heart of Denise LaSalle. The love she shared with James Wolfe, her husband for the last 41 years of her life; her dedication to her children and grandchildren (as well as the countless “adopted” children, including many of her band members, whom she collected over the years); her profound gifts as a loyal and loving friend--these, as much as the music she made, represent the living legacy of Denise LaSalle.

After I wrote a chapter on her for my book Southern Soul Blues, (which also includes “America’s Prodigal Son”), Denise contacted me and told me she wanted us to work together on her autobiography; we had been working on it for over a year when she passed. The last time we spent together was three days in Milan, Tennessee, at the rehabilitation center where she was staying, following a leg amputation she had undergone in October of 2017. Although there were still plenty of things we wanted to talk about, we got enough done for the book--if all goes well, it will come out sometime next year. The working title was Still the Queen (also the title of her 2002 debut on Ecko), but now that my beloved friend has made her transition into glory, I believe the title will be Always the Queen.

Denise called me on January 6, about a week after we’d spent those final precious days together in Milan. Characteristically gracious, she thanked me effusively for having spent those days with her, and we talked for a while, making plans to see each other again as soon as I could make it back South. The last words we said to each other were, “I love you.”

CODA: “When the Gates Swing Open”

On the evening of January 8, the Jackson, Tennessee-based southern soul radio deejay Jazzii A was putting together a program in honor of Otis Clay, who had died two years earlier. In his memory, she presented a show honoring artists who had passed away--a “Soul Heaven” theme--culminating with a segment featuring Clay himself. The final song she played was “When the Gates Swing Open,” Otis’s monumental gospel tribute, the song he sang at so many people’s funerals over the years. At the very moment when it was coming to an end, as the final notes were fading out and Jazzii was wrapping up her taping--at that precise second--she got the call from Denise’s daughter: “Jazzii, come to the hospital. My mother is dying.”

The Queen left us, two years to the day, after Otis Clay. And Otis Clay sang her home.

--David Whiteis

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide



January 13, 2018: Denise LaSalle Update!

Due to inclement weather, the services (below) have been postponed until Monday, January 15th. The funeral will be held at 11 am in Englewood Baptist Church, 2239 N. Highland Ave., in Jackson, TN.. Visitation 9-11 am.

January 9, 2018:

DENISE LASALLE
(1939-2018)
Funeral Services:


Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 11:00 AM at Liberty Technology High School Auditorium
3470 Ridgecrest Road Ext.
Jackson, TN

Visitation will be from 9:00 - 11:00 AM on Saturday morning at Liberty Technology High School Auditorium

Funeral Home in Charge:
Wolfe Brothers Funeral Home
128 South 7th Street
West Memphis, AR

See "Southern Soul Blues" author David Whiteis' letter in Daddy B. Nice's Mailbag!

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October 17, 2017:

Denise LaSalle has recently undergone a leg amputation at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville...

Denise LaSalle recently underwent a leg amputation at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, where she was transfered from a hospital in her hometown of Jackson, Tennessee, according to a news release by family spokesman Howard Rambsy. LaSalle's right leg had to be amputated to prevent further medical complications.

Ms. LaSalle she would like for her fans and musical community to know that she has undergone her surgery and emerged "still trapped by the wonderful thing called love, and as long as there is love, the love that she has for her fans and the love that they have for her, the future will remain a bright and worthy destination.”

Only last year (2016), LaSalle underwent triple bypass surgery. (Scroll down to "Tidbits #4" below).

--Daddy B. Nice

See news story in the "Jackson (Tennessee) Sun".

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide

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Note: Denise LaSalle also appears on Daddy B. Nice's original Top 100 Southern Soul Artists (90's-00's). The "21st Century" after Denise LaSalle's name in the headline is to distinguish her artist-guide entries on this page from her artist-guide page on Daddy B. Nice's original chart.

*********

Scroll down to "Tidbits" for the latest updates on Denise LaSalle. To automatically link to Denise LaSalle's charted radio singles, awards, CD's and many other references on the website, go to "LaSalle, Denise" in Daddy B. Nice's Comprehensive Index.

***********

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Mississippi Woman" on YouTube while you read.

April 27, 2013:

Daddy B. Nice's Profile:



If you live long enough, and you're successful enough, and the "past lifetimes" just keep piling up--one on top of another--you have an idea of the present-day career of the indomitable Denise LaSalle, who (along with Shirley Brown) has become the foremost interpreter of Southern Soul music in the contemporary era.

The irony is that choosing among and negotiating scintillating covers of contemporary hits such as Will T's "Mississippi Boy" or Pat Cooley's "Older Woman" was the least of Denise's many head-turning strengths in her younger days, when she made her name as a songwriter, then as a song-writing performer.

These days--and many "lifetimes" and CD's later--LaSalle's most memorable self-written performances tend to be career-capsulizing anthems such as I'm Still The Queen," and even "Still The Queen" was a vehicle written for LaSalle primarily by John Ward and Raymond Moore.

LaSalle always had a great voice, but in the 21st century her vocals have become even more significant, with the dues of experience adding another, shadow-lengthening dimension. Her songs are infused with her stature in the R&B community, audibly loose and bedrock-confident. Denise LaSalle really still is the "Queen."

And, much earthier than Shirley Brown, and often labelled a modern-day Bessie Smith, the ornery LaSalle isn't afraid to sing or say anything with an imagination and mouth as foul as Millie Jackson's. But the bracing shock and laughter quotient are accompanied on the listener's part by an admiration for the ease and fluidity of LaSalle's thought process, and the casual and charismatic tone and timbre of her one-of-a-kind voice.

The entire package generates a dump truck's-worth of charm. In concert performances LaSalle radiates this accomplished personality through a mix of vocal sophistication and bawdy war-of-the-sexes themes, all delivered with Ella Fitzgerald-graciousness and Duke Ellington-elegance.

--Daddy B. Nice


About Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)

Denise LaSalle (born Ora Denise Allen in 1939) was raised in Belzoni, Mississippi. Well-versed in gospel music as a child, she also picked up secular musical influences from early R&B, Grand Ole Opry, and local juke joint music. In her twenties she moved north to Chicago and pursued a songwriting career. A Chess Records executive, Billy "The Kid" Emerson, met LaSalle while she was working as a bar maid, and this gradually led her into recording and performing.

LaSalle's first hit record was 1971's "Trapped By A Thing Called Love" (Westbound Records), which crossed over to the pop charts and went gold. The follow-up, "Now Run Tell That," was a million-seller on the R&B charts. LaSalle moved to ABC Records and recorded three solid albums in the late seventies before ABC was bought out by MCA, and MCA dropped her in the eighties as, nationwide, R&B declined in popularity.

Malaco Records of Jackson, Mississippi was just beginning to fill the vacuum, however, with artists such as Z.Z. Hill and Johnnie Taylor, and a LaSalle songwriting assignment for Hill led to a recording career that no one could have anticipated, beginning early on (1985) with LaSalle's signature zydeco track and concert favorite, "Don't Mess With My Tu Tu" (which LaSalle later changed to "My Toot Toot").

From the mid-eighties through the mid-nineties, LaSalle recorded ten Southern Soul albums as one of Malaco Record's flagship artists, notching popular Dixie-radio singles like "Don't Cry No More," "Your Husband Is Cheating On Us," "It Be's That Way Sometimes," "I Was Not The Best Woman," "Drop That Zero," "Long Dong Silver" and "Blues Party Tonight."

The turn of the century saw LaSalle leave Malaco for a couple of independent CD's and a gospel project before inking a contract in 2002 with Memphis's Ecko Records, whose owner John Ward was a Malaco alumnus. The change of venue seemed to reinvigorate LaSalle.

Interest in the genre had grown, and she put out a higher-profile series of albums between 2002 and 2007: Still The Queen, Wanted, & Pay Before You Pump--tallying popular Southern Soul and Blues singles like "It's Going Down," "What Kind Of Man Is This," "Snap, Crackle & Pop," "The Thrill Is On Again," "You Should Have Kept It In The Bedroom" and "The Love You Threw Away" in addition to the three album title tunes.

The record that made the biggest impact, however, was "Mississippi Woman," LaSalle's gender-switching version of Will T.'s "Mississippi Boy," (which had already been covered once by Charles Wilson). LaSalle's "Mississippi Woman," with a souped up, electric-blues arrangement by John Ward, surpassed them all and became a big hit, so much so that Malaco invited LaSalle back for a similar stab at success with 2010's 24 Hour Woman.

"Older Woman (Looking For A Younger Man," a cover of the already popular Pat Cooley single of the same name, was the feature song of the set, combining one of LaSalle's most far-ranging and masterful vocals with an hilariously honest and ribald voice-over about men and women.

However, the label decided to feature "Cheat Receipt," a cover of a Toni Green Southern Soul song, as the primary single from the album. By the time LaSalle's "Older Woman" was released as a single, the buzz had seemingly passed the album by and "Older Woman," LaSalle's last major single (as of this writing) and finest work since "Mississippi Woman" is now rarely heard on Southern Soul radio and has no YouTube offering.

April 12, 2015... Daddy B. Nice notes: "Older Woman" is now on YouTube!

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Older Woman" on YouTube.

Denise LaSalle Discography:

1972 Trapped By a Thing Called Love (Westbound)

1973 On the Loose (Westbound)

1975 Here I Am Again (Westbound)

1976 Second Breath (ABC)

1977 The Bitch Is Bad (ABC)

1979 Under the Influence (ABC)

1979 Unwrapped (MCA)

1980 I'm So Hot (MCA)

1981 And Satisfaction Guaranteed (MCA)

1983 Lady In The Street (Malaco)

1984 Right Place, Right Time (Malaco)

1985 Love Talkin' (Malaco)

1986 Rain & Fire (Malaco)

1987 It's Lying Time Again (Malaco)

1988 Hittin' Where It Hurts (Malaco)

1990 Still Trapped (Malaco)

1990 Do Ya Think I'm Sexy? (Universal)

1992 Love Me Right (Malaco)

1994 Still Bad (Malaco)

1996 Before You Take It to the Streets (Ichiban)

1997 Smokin' in Bed (Malaco)

1999 Trapped (601 Music)

1999 God's Got My Back (Angel In The Mist)

2000 This Real Woman (Ordena)

2001 There's No Separation (Ordena)

2001 I Get What I Want: The Best Of The ABC Years (Connoisseur Collection)

2002 Still the Queen (Ecko)

2003 My Toot Toot: Definitive Anthology (Smith & Co.)

2004 Wanted (Ecko)

2006 I'm So Hot (P-Vine)

2007 Pay Before You Pump (Ecko)

2008 A Little Bit Naughty: The ABC & MCA Years (Shout)

2010 24 Hour Woman (Malaco)

2012 At Her Best (Ecko)

2013 Making a Good Thing Better: The Complete Westbound Singles 1970-76 (Ace)


Tidbits

1.

April 26, 2013: Denise LaSalle on YouTube


Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Mississippi Woman" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Don't Cry No More" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Don't Mess With My Tu Tu" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "The Queen Is Back (I'm Still The Queen)" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Watch a fascinating German-animated video set to Denise Lasalle singing "Don't Mess With My Tu Tu" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Trapped By A Thing Called Love" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Mississippi (Delta Blues Mix)" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Why Am I Missing You" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Snap, Crackle & Pop" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Going Through Changes" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "It Be's That Way Sometimes" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Blues Party Tonight" Live Onstage on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Lick It Before You Stick It" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Long Dong Silver" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "I'm Still The Queen" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Drop That Zero" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Down Home Blues" on YouTube.

2.

April 27, 2013:

The Best Denise Lasalle Compilations You May Have Never Heard Of:


Making a Good Thing Better: The Complete Westbound Singles 1970-76

My Toot Toot: An Anthology

Denise Lasalle: At Her Best

I Get What I Want: The Best Of The ABC Years

A Little Bit Naughty: The ABC & MCA Years

On the Loose/Trapped by a Thing Called Love (Import)

3.


April 12, 2015: NEW SINGLES ALERT!

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Grown Folks Business" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Tiptoeing Through The Bedroom" on YouTube.

See Daddy B. Nice's Top Ten Southern Soul Singles Review April 2015 (#9-ranked).

Denise LaSalle enters the autumn of her career...

....That's what these thought-provoking tunes proclaim. The voice (never a "belter" like her peers Peggy Scott-Adams or Shirley Brown) is even weaker now. You can sense the fragility of the flesh behind the performance, yet Denise's character and moxie are still as strong as ever. The subject matter, a mother’s scolding of a pestering child ("Grown Folks Business"), is almost embarrassingly domestic for a southern soul audience expecting sexual double entendres on the order of La Salle’s signature “Don’t Mess With My TuTu.” Young folks may not understand what all the fuss is about. Grown folks will be fascinated by Denise's daring in once again doing what hasn't been done before.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Grown Folks Business" on YouTube.

Listen to Denise LaSalle singing "Tiptoeing Through The Bedroom" on YouTube.


From Denise LaSalle's upcoming album, STILL SWINGING, written and produced by Joe H. Akines for Chi-Jaxx Records.

4. Denise in Hospital



July 5, 2016: Posted from Daddy B. Nice's Mailbag

Denise LaSalle has had triple bypass surgery.

She's in Intensive Care right now -- according to her husband, she's doing okay; I believe she had the operation today. They're looking at five or six weeks' recovery time,

David W.

See Daddy B. Nice's 21st-Century Artist Guide to Denise LaSalle.

Listen to the new duet by Karen Wolfe and Denise LaSalle: "Shake A Little Something."

********

October 23, 2016: From the desk of David Whiteis....

Denise LaSalle will begin touring again in December . . . She has two gigs lined up already (I'll try to get more details -- I believe one is in Flint, Michigan on December 17) -- but right now, she wants everyone to know that

"The Queen is back"

and she's ready to work. So -- promoters, bookers, etc., take note!

Daddy B. Nice notes:

David Whiteis is the author Southern Soul Blues and a close associate of Denise LaSalle.

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide





Honorary "B" Side

"Older Woman (Looking For A Younger Man)"



5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Mississippi Woman by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Mississippi Woman


CD: Pay Before You Pump
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
Pay Before You Pump


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Older Woman (Looking For A Younger Man) by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Older Woman (Looking For A Younger Man)


CD: 24 Hour Woman
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
24 Hour Woman


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy (Don't Mess With) My TuTu (Toot Toot) by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
(Don't Mess With) My TuTu (Toot Toot)


CD: Love Talkin'
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
Love Talkin'


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Don't Cry No More by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Don't Cry No More


CD: My Toot Toot: Definitive Anthology
Label: Smith & Co.

Sample or Buy
My Toot Toot: Definitive Anthology


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy I'm Still The Queen by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
I'm Still The Queen


CD: At Her Best
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
At Her Best


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy The Love You Threw Away by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
The Love You Threw Away


CD: Wanted
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
Wanted


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy The Thrill Is On Again by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
The Thrill Is On Again


CD: Wanted
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
Wanted


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Trapped By A Thing Called Love by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Trapped By A Thing Called Love


CD: My Toot Toot: Definitive Anthology
Label: Smith & Co.

Sample or Buy
My Toot Toot: Definitive Anthology


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Cheat Receipt by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Cheat Receipt


CD: 24 Hour Woman
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
24 Hour Woman


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Five Below Zero by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Five Below Zero


CD: Smokin' In Bed
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
Smokin' In Bed


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Now Run Tell That by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Now Run Tell That


CD: Making a Good Thing Better: The Complete Westbound
Label: Ace

Sample or Buy
Making a Good Thing Better: The Complete Westbound Singles 1970-76


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Pay Before You Pump by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Pay Before You Pump


CD: Pay Before You Pump
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
Pay Before You Pump


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Snap, Crackle & Pop by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Snap, Crackle & Pop


CD: Wanted
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
Wanted


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy What Kind Of Man Is This by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
What Kind Of Man Is This


CD: This Real Woman
Label: Ordena

Sample or Buy
This Real Woman


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy You Should Have Kept It In The Bedroom by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
You Should Have Kept It In The Bedroom


CD: At Her Best
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
At Her Best


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Blues Party Tonight by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Blues Party Tonight


CD: Smokin' In Bed
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
Smokin' In Bed


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Home Wrecker by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Home Wrecker


CD: 24 Hour Woman
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
24 Hour Woman


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy I Was Not The Best Woman (Just The Biggest Fool) by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
I Was Not The Best Woman (Just The Biggest Fool)


CD: Lady In The Street
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
Lady In The Street


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy It's Going Down by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
It's Going Down


CD: Pay Before You Pump
Label: Ecko

Sample or Buy
Pay Before You Pump


3 Stars 3 Stars 3 Stars 
Sample or Buy Your Husband Is Cheating On Us by Denise LaSalle 1939-2018 (An Appreciation)
Your Husband Is Cheating On Us


CD: Right Place, Right Time
Label: Malaco

Sample or Buy
Right Place, Right Time


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