Stan Butler (New CD Review)

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Stan Butler (New CD Review)

February 1, 2017:

Re-Posted from Daddy B. Nice's CD Reviews

January 24, 2017:

STAN BUTLER: Back To Basics (Stantavio Butler / Stan Butler Productions) Four Stars **** Distinguished Effort by a New Southern Soul Artist.

The story of Stan Butler's rise from "a complete unknown" to Daddy B. Nice's Best Southern Soul Debut Of The Year should hearten the spirits of any musical aspirant across the chitlin' circuit. First, as noted in my first charting for Stan Butler in June of 2016, deejays and critics don't just wait for product to come to them. They also beat the bushes in search of that "new thang." That's how, while hacking through the YouTube musical jungle, I came upon...

2. "Tootie Boot"------Stan Butler

Here's another choice cut from an unknown artist who's never contacted your Daddy B. Nice. Also check out his first official video: "I Took My Grandma To The Club."


Listen to Stan Butler singing "Tootie Boot" on YouTube.

Shortly thereafter, still in June, I heard from Stan Butler, and received a package with three or four copies of BACK TO BASICS. I told him I wouldn't review the CD until, at the least, he posted it on CD Baby for distribution. And although declining to interview him (which "Soul Dog" Neal Furr subsequently did a fine job of doing anyway), I told Stan to work on his music--that I only wanted to relate to that. It was the music I wanted to excite me. And, wow, did he come through--three successive singles as follows:

-------JULY 2016---------

5. "Third Of The Month"------ Stan Butler

A rhythm guitarist's dream. Extraordinary confidence and expertise from such a neophyte singer/songwriter. Kinda weird, though, a young'un taking up the cause of the social-security crowd. Hope it's not patronization--and I don't think it is. Profiled this month on Southern Soul Corner With The "Soul Dog" Neal Furr.

Listen to Stan Butler singing "Third Of The Month" on YouTube.

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Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "BREAKING" Southern Soul Singles Preview For. . .

-------SEPTEMBER 2016---------

2. "Take Me To The Bootlegger"------ Stan Butler

A true outsider (Georgia) as yet unfamiliar with southern soul's deejay circuit, this young man is the real thing, a writer/performer of great promise, and he's getting better with each new record. This is his third appearance here in four months. "Bootlegger" has the scope and lyricism of a classic. Write stanb478@gmail.com for service.

Listen to Stan Butler singing "Take Me To The Bootlegger" on YouTube.

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Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "BREAKING" Southern Soul Singles Preview For. . .

-------NOVEMBER 2016-------

1. ”Preacher Was A Home Wrecker”-----Stan Butler

Like the young Bob Dylan, like the young Sir Charles Jones, the young Stan Butler is on an artistic “roll” so pure and unstoppable it’s a joy to behold. I’m not comparing Stan to these greats, just drawing attention to his seemingly inexhaustible creativity, because when I say “on a roll” I mean a song a month, not a song a year. Only a handful of recording artists achieve this kind of sequential inspiration, and only for a brief period.

Listen to Stan Butler singing ”Preacher Was A Home Wrecker” on YouTube.


Meanwhile, back at Quent Jackson's Big Baby Studios in the Macon suburbs, where Butler had recorded the tunes for Back To Basics, Stan's growing local profile had landed him a gig as the opening act for a Macon appearance of Cameo, requiring a live band. As with the CD distribution, the necessities of the music business had heeded the call of Stan Butler's talent, not the other way around, and Butler hooked up with a John Mills-managed group called The Unit, performing in front of an audience of three-thousand.

It's not easy to pinpoint the wellspring of Butler's talent. He's a humble-looking and humble-sounding young man, with an average voice (for an R&B star), and production still blemished with amateurish tics and musical spaces crying out for detail. And yet, the talent cannot be denied. It's difficult not to keep listening to a Stan Butler song. Reality, in all its sensory glory, is emoted.

I was anticipating a three-star ("solid") critique for Back To Basics, which Butler finally got around to offering for sale on CD Baby not long ago. After all, it only has two of the songs mentioned above, "Tootie Boot" and "Took My Grandma To The Club." Everything else--the bulk of the great music quoted above--has come since then, making the album almost obsolete before it hits the market. Surely, the next album will be much better--the breakthrough, if you will.

But I came away surprised by Back To Basics. With only seven full tracks, the set yet has a undeniable fullness, and the other five tracks (with the exception of one, "Woman Must Be Cheating," which has the same rhythm track as "Took My Grandma To The Club") are not just throw-away's.

"Respect Your Woman" lacks the definition of a focused songwriter, but "Got Me A Woman" (with Ron G.) is a superb composition, with a melody that sinks the hook and pulls the listener along for five pleasurable minutes.

"Caught Up," too, is a fine piece of songwriting, with an interesting arrangement and the kind of special but somehow still "everyman"-like vocal that we have come to expect from Butler. Listening to "Caught Up," you can make out the song structure Stan would later bring to the spectacular "Preacher Was A Home Wrecker."

"Trust Me, Baby" (featuring Yale), has a chitlin' circuit-friendly couplet:

"Every time I take off my clothes,
You're smelling my drawers."

Butler asks his lover to "let him go" if she "don't trust me no more." A seductive bass line and a rap verse are only two of the musical elements that make the song memorable.

Taken as a whole, and combined with the more well-known "Tootie Boot" and "Took My Grandma To The Club," the songs of BACK TO BASICS constitute a satisfying if short set. Nothing compared to what's coming next from Stan Butler, though. Can hardly wait.

--Daddy B. Nice

Sample/Buy Stan Butler's BACK TO BASICS at CD Baby.

*********

--Daddy B. Nice



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