King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul

Daddy B. Nice's #18 ranked Southern Soul Artist



Portrait of King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul by Daddy B. Nice
 


"Keep On Rollin'"

King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul

See the chart.

Listen to King George singing "Keep On Rollin'" on YouTube.

April 1, 2022: Daddy B. Nice's Profile

Once more, in the tradition of Big Pokey Bear, Tucka and Ronnie Bell, a recording artist and a "complete unknown" comes out of nowhere with a hit single containing so much swagger, honesty and downright emotion it eclipses everything else out there. On its various YouTube pages "Keep On Rollin'" by King George has amassed millions of page views in a little over a month.

Nine months ago (July 2021) a debut novelty single called "Chicken Wang" by a first-time artist named Klay Redd started out with a rousing introduction that went as follows:

"Girl there's a brand new king in town
And he came here to swing.
He's 'bout to take you by the hand
And take you back down memory lane..."

The emphasis was on "brand new king in town," and Redd's vocal was terrific, stressing the "brand new king" like a dawn rooster cock-a-doodling reveille. At first I assumed the singer was talking about himself, but as the months passed with no follow-up singles from Redd, I wondered if the announcement of the brand new king was a tip of the hat to King South, a Slacktraxx/Jeter Jones protege whose YouTube video for "Southern Soul Cowboy" had recently amassed an astounding 3 million-plus views and a thousand-plus, appreciative comments.

Little did I know that yet another "king" was about to blow up the southern soul scene---the real "king," let us say, the "king of kings"---and his name was King George. Like King South, King George's 2020-recorded music ("(Can't Stay) Too Long," "Friday Night," "Leave & Party") was quietly blowing up YouTube with millions of views, yet as far as the traditional chitlin' circuit was concerned, those songs could have been "gestating" since 2020.

Then King George released a single that dwarfed the considerable accomplishments of his prior singles: "Keep On Rollin'," an instantaneous #1 on Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 Singles for March 2022.

Here's the capsule review:

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Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "BREAKING" Southern Soul Singles For. . .

-------MARCH 2022-------

1. "Keep On Rollin'" ------- King George

Three million YouTube views in less than a month! I'm in awe of the power of southern soul music to connect with the fans. It doesn't matter if it's an "unknown". "Keep On Rollin" speaks to that unconscious "id" we all carry around, unaware we're blinkered by social norms until we encounter someone who upsets that apple cart of civility. That's why we're so tickled and pleased when Pokey Bear has the boldness to sing, "But I ain't coming home until three," or King George sings, "One monkey don't stop no show."

Listen to King George singing "Keep On Rollin'" on YouTube.
******************


And in the month since King George has reigned at the top of the singles charts the audience for "Keep On Rollin'" has doubled again to six million page views! Meanwhile, videos of King George performing live have proliferated on the Internet, adding to the demand to hear and see this recording artist up close.

From Daddy B. Nice's Mailbag:

"What is going on with King George he doesn't have a concert until JULY what the heck. He has five must have songs and he's the hottest in the Southern Soul and R&B chart they ticket sales looking for him." (sic)

So yes, King George is the "brand new king" Klay Redd was unknowingly proclaiming in "Chicken Wang". Everyone's talking about King George, and the most jaw-dropping evidence of his supersonic rise up the southern soul ranks came with the announcement that King George was replacing southern soul circuit star Calvin Richardson as headliner at the upcoming Evergreen Weekend Concert in Starkville, Mississippi.

There hasn't been a phenomenon like this---an artist shooting to prominence, past all the other veterans and aspiring newcomers who've been laboring in the vineyards for years---since Bishop Bullwinkle and Big Pokey Bear. In fact you'd have to go all the way back to Theodis Ealey and "Stand Up In It" to even relate to how much an artist's career has benefitted from just one super-influential single ("Keep On Rollin'").

Cynics might ask how an artist without even a long-play album to his credit could rank so highly on this New Generation of Southern Soul chart. But in truth, how could anyone rank King George any lower? No one can predict what the future holds for this recording artist. But one thing stands out: King George has achieved unheard-of brand recognition in just two or three months.

A fluke? Hardly. Here are some of the aspects of King George's success that may have gone unnoticed in the midst of all the hype and hoopla:

1/ Don't forget the sound of King George's records. The underlying music is rich in southern soul tradition, encompassing tempo, production, lyrics and vocalizing. The instrumental tracks work so well it's easy to overlook them---solid, humble, yet exquisitely executed---invariably starting out with a satisfying guitar lick but then, in hallowed southern soul fashion, surrendering all the prominence to the vocals. And what vocals!

2/ A handful of King George songs debuted in 2020, two years before the appearance of "Keep On Rollin'" in January '22. Those previously-released songs also gained adherents in the millions of page views on YouTube. Initially, I wasn't impressed by "Too Long," the most popular of these tunes, even wondering how it had gained so many fans. But in watching videos of King George's live appearances, "Too Long" was often showcased and began to take visible shape. I began to decipher the comely melody, the classic tempo, and above all the lyrics.

Lyrically, "Too Long" is the complete opposite of "Keep On Rollin'". Instead of the stubborn ne'er do well so vividly sketched in "Rollin'," "Too Long" chronicles the life of a good husband, the kind of responsible guy who would find it hard to articulate the attention and kindness he showers upon his mate, the "angel" who entered his life and showed him the meaning of true love.

"Can't stay too long," he sings. "I gotta keep moving." It's the perfect metaphor for a faithful lover, but how many artists have come up with this nugget illustrating the power of love? That's right. None. Until King George.

3/ And to return to "Keep On Rollin'," how many appreciative fans have picked up on the fact that King George doesn't say, "I'm gonna keep on rolling"? He says "This train" gonna keep rollin'". It's subtle things like that (using the "train" metaphor) that make it so much easier to sing along.

And how about the double-tracked vocals? Not synchronous. Call and response---the equivalent of a background singer---which deepens and enriches the overall sound. This is one sophisticated dude.

4/ Then there's the previously-released "Leave & Party," which begins with a devastatingly accurate (and typically unobtrusive) instrumental intro recycling the legendary style of Tyrone Davis. This song is actually the precursor to 2022's "Keep On Rollin'". It features a working-class guy who wants to transition into a weekend vagabond and "get his party on," and it even introduces some of the accomodating ladies who will take on prominence in "Keep On Rollin'".

5/ "Leave & Party" also breaks another barrier---indeed, smashes it to the smithereens. That would be the reluctance of southern soul artists to mention marijuana in their lyrics. Your Daddy B. Nice can remember rousing the ire of T.K. Soul two decades ago by mistakenly reporting that he'd used references to pot in his lyrics. And I do not blame young black men for distancing themselves from the subject. I've so often rhapsodized about the pleasures of visiting hamlets throughout the Delta over the years. What I haven't mentioned is the chagrin of entering a small town and seeing a chain-linked, razor-wired prison yard right in the town square where you'd expect to see a courthouse---testifying to the oppressiveness of the Deep South's incarcerations of young blacks in particular. But here is King George, singing, "Keisha don't care when I drink and smoke weed." Later in the tune it's "a big bag of reefer". No artist has been that explicit before.

6/ Last but not least, King George appeals to the white market, as shown by the countless Tik Tok videos of people of all ethnicities dancing to "Keep On Rollin'". This could be the beginning of the future for southern soul: the tipping point where the white audience catches on. It's only a matter of time before the genre crosses over and mutates into a new and vibrant rock and roll, and when that happens, all of the neglected southern soul artists of the last thirty years chronicled in these pages will be talked about as if people had known of them all their lives.

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide

--Daddy B. Nice


About King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul

April 9, 2022: Update!

See Daddy B. Nice's Mailbag for fresh biographical information on King George as a rap artist!

April 1, 2022: Daddy B. Nice notes...

I have no biographical information on King George at this time. The recording artist has never contacted me. All that I have written about him is a reflection of the tremendous impact he has made on the southern soul fan base and an acknowledgement of the man's phenomenal talent and grasp of southern soul music. His songs began appearing on YouTube in 2020 and he has yet to publish a long-play album. Below are some notes chronicling my awareness of King George.

March 1, 2022: Contemporaneous Notes

Here are just a few snippets from the admittedly giddy journey your Daddy B. Nice has traveled since first becoming aware of "Keep On Rollin'" just two weeks ago.

1/ On hearing the tune for the first time, Daddy B. Nice features "Keep On Rollin'" in the February 14th "News & Notes" in a story on four-letter expletives in recent southern soul singles:

....Which brings me to a new song in the vein of Arthur Young's "Funky Forty". It uses the word "fuck" in such an apt and conversational and seemingly ordinary fashion that it may sneak or even charm its way onto radio platforms. It's by a new artist named King George and it's entitled "Keep On Rollin'". The lyrics in question concern a man whose mate is leaving him. He retorts that she can "go ahead and leave" because "one monkey don't stop no show". King George needs not one or two but three(!) women at the same time, and it goes like this: (I need) "One woman just to hold me down / One woman just to lift me up / And I gotta have at least one woman on the side / That really don't give a fuck."

2/ Downloaded onto Daddy B. Nice's huge monthly playlist of new work (from which the monthly Top 10 Singles and Top 40 Singles are culled), "Keep On Rollin'" quickly rises like cream to the top, propelled by its distinctive melody, tempo and vocal performance. And of special mention, two lines from the lyrics immediately stand out as original and powerful additions to the southern soul lyrical canon:

"And I got to have at least one woman on the side,
That really don't give a fuck."

and....

"One thing you got to remember,
One monkey don't stop no show."

3/ In researching (or shall we just say "googling") King George, your Daddy B. Nice discovers he's been active on the touring circuit of late, including solo gigs and a supporting role in Coldrank's Birthday Bash last January 8th. But the performance that really stands out is a snippet from a well-attended outdoor gig in which a very ordinary-looking, bespectacled (no costume or dress-up) King George is wearing a backpack onstage. (See King George in concert wearing a backpack.) That's something I have never seen. And it speaks to the fact that George must not have had anyone with him to watch his stuff! And yet the big, night-time audience is totally into the song and familiar with the lyrics, at one point chanting them out without the performer.

4/ Further research indicates that "Keep On Rollin'" isn't King George's first time out. A December YouTube video posted the day before Christmas in 2020 has accrued almost four million page views. The song is "(Can't Stay) Too Long". And another song from 2020, "Friday Night," is even better: an update, if you will, of Sir Charles Jones' "Friday". These songs and others are available as singles, although no album is available yet. (Buy King George singles at Apple.)

5. In my initial write-up in February's "News & Notes" (Daddy B. Nice's Corner) I wondered if "Keep On Rollin'" could possibly "charm" its way onto radio in spite of the "fuck". Well, it has and it did. Listening to my favorite station and deejay (that would be WMPR Jackson, Mississippi and DJ Ragman) the other afternoon, I was astounded to hear the opening chords of the song and I listened raptly to see how they would deal with the "I really don't give a fuck." Very simple, they just blanked out the "fuck". It was great to hear it on radio. (And that's what is called a radio edit.)

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide


Tidbits

March 12, 2022:

1. King George On YouTube



Watch TikTokkers cavort in fun to King George's "Keep On Rollin'," including parents sending their recalcitrant children out the door (!).

Listen to King George singing "Leave And Party" on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing "Friday Night" on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing live in concert in Laurel, Mississippi.

Listen to King George (w/ backpack(!) singing "Keep On Rollin'" live in concert on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing his songs live in concert on Valentine's Day on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing "Friday Night" live in concert on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing "Too Long" on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing "Keep On Rollin'" on YouTube.

Listen to King George singing "Love Song" on YouTube.

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide

April 2, 2022:

2. King George's initial appearances in Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 Singles:



Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "BREAKING" Southern Soul Singles For. . .

-------MARCH 2022-------

1. "Keep On Rollin'" ------- King George

Three million YouTube views in less than a month! I'm in awe of the power of southern soul music to connect with the fans. It doesn't matter if it's an "unknown". "Keep On Rollin" speaks to that unconscious id we all carry around, unaware we're blinkered by social norms until we encounter someone who upsets that apple cart of civility. That's why we're so tickled and pleased when Pokey Bear has the boldness to sing, "But I ain't coming home until three," or King George sings, "One monkey don't stop no show."

Listen to King George singing "Keep On Rollin'" on YouTube.

See more Daddy B. Nice commentary on King George.


.....7. "Friday Night" ----- King George

Here's another impressive tune---an update of Sir Charles Jones' "Friday---by the young artist taking southern soul by storm. (See #1 above.)

Listen to King George singing "Friday Night" on YouTube.


*********************

Daddy B. Nice's Top 10 "BREAKING" Southern Soul Singles For. . .

-------APRIL 2022-------

1. "Too Long" ------- King George

We fans can be forgiven for asso-
ciating the artist's personal life with the lyrics, as in King George's #1-ranked, bad-boy-boasting "Keep On Rollin'" (March '22). But George's "Too Long," which languished (if you can call three million views "languishing") on YouTube for two years before "Keep On Rollin'" broke at #1, is just the opposite. The lyrics portray a conscientious and responsible man in love with his mate withstanding the temptations of touring. "Can't stay too long / I gotta keep moving" is King George's refrain as he navigates the women trying "to get his attention." "Too Long" gained three million page views in just one month since "Keep On Rollin'" debuted at Daddy B. Nice's #1.

See Daddy B. Nice's new artist guide: King George The New Generation of Southern Soul.

Listen to King George singing "Too Long" on YouTube.

2. "Leave & Party"----- King George

Recorded two years ago, "Leave & Party" is the precursor to King George's southern soul mega-hit, "Keep On Rollin'". Similar in tone, tempo and chording, complete with exhilarating, gospel-style background vocals, "Leave & Party" introduces Keisha and the obliging gals from "Keep On Rollin'" who are happy to pamper George after a hard week of work when all he wants to do is "get drunk, smoke weed" and "get his party on".

Listen to King George singing "Leave & Party" on YouTube.

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide

3. May 5, 2022: King George (previously a rap artist): originally posted in Daddy B. Nice's Mailbag


April 9, 2022:

Is King George Also Known As The Rapper Yung Holliday?

Hello, I’ve been listening to King George …is he also known as Yung Holliday in the Rap Genre?

Denee

Daddy B. Nice replies:

You're on to something there, Denee. You know, Pokey Bear also came from rap/hiphop. Your question sent me scurrying back to YouTube and this is what I found. "When We Fuck" by Yung Holliday definitely sounds like King George, as does "Pisces (Trap Love)". These rap tunes and others ("Run The Streets," "Whole Lotta Money" and "Cell Block III") are produced (or "presented" or "uploaded" as the case may be) by legendary rap artist Too Short, who used to be one of my favorites before I got into southern soul ("Short But Funky," "It's About That Money" with Puff Daddy & Faith Evans) despite being one of the dirtiest-mouthed rappers ever. On the other hand, there's also a rap artist named Young ("young" not "yung") Holliday with albums "Path To Greatness" and "Holiweek"---not King George.

I can't confirm it with utter certainty at this point, but I agree that Yung Holiday is the rap alter ego---or rap forerunner---of King George, and here's why. First, in addition to sounding like him, the video to "When We Fuck" clearly looks like him. Second, Too Short, Yung Holliday and King George all have connections (King George and Yung Holiday as active artists) to Dominique Geiger-headed Ace Visonz, the label that has released all of King George's hits. Now that George has broke into southern soul stardom, however, I doubt we'll be seeing much of Yung Holliday.

Thank you so much, Denee for shedding light on the origins of King George.

SouthernSoulRnB.com - Chitlin' Circuit Southern Soul Music Guide


Honorary "B" Side

"Too Long"



5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Keep On Rollin' by  King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul
Keep On Rollin'


CD: Keep On Rollin' (The Single)
Label: Ace Visionz Productions

Sample or Buy
Keep On Rollin' (The Single)


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Too Long by  King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul
Too Long


CD: Too Long (The Single)
Label: Ace Visionz Productions

Sample or Buy
Too Long (The Single)


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Friday Night by  King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul
Friday Night


CD: Friday Night (The Single)
Label: Ace Visionz Productions

Sample or Buy
Friday Night (The Single)


5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 5 Stars 
Sample or Buy Leave & Party by  King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul
Leave & Party


CD: Leave & Party (The Single)
Label: Ace Visionz Productions

Sample or Buy
Leave & Party (The Single)


4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 4 Stars 
Sample or Buy Be With You by  King George #18 The New Generation Southern Soul
Be With You


CD: Be With You (The Single)
Label: Ace Visionz Productions

Sample or Buy
Be With You (The Single)


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